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Getting Cataract Surgery? Learn About the Recovery

When cataracts progress and seriously disrupt your vision so everything looks faded and fuzzy, cataract surgery offers effective treatment to restore clear vision.

If you’re ready to join the approximately 8.5 million people in the United States who undergo cataract removal surgery each year, it’s helpful to learn what to expect afterwards. Our eye doctor in Wyckoff and Woodcliff Lake explains all the basic steps of recovery:

  • Cataract surgery is typically done as an outpatient procedure. Typically, the procedure itself takes less than 30 minutes, but you’ll need to stay at the eye clinic for about two to three hours.
  • After the procedure, eye drops will be inserted and your eye may be covered with a bandage or shield to wear for about a day.
  • You will not be able to drive yourself home; be sure to arrange a ride.
  • At home, you’ll need to apply eye drops several times per day (usually for a few weeks) as treatments to prevent infection and reduce inflammation.
  • It’s recommended to wear an eye shield while sleeping during the first week after cataract surgery. Sunglasses should be worn outdoors.
  • Most sedentary activities are permitted by that night. Driving isn’t allowed until your eye doctor checks your vision on the next day.
  • You may experience ocular discomfort, such as watering, grittiness, itching, bloodshot eyes, blurry or double vision. Don’t rub or push on your eye!
  • Blurry vision is normal for the first few days. Then, it should sharpen and colors will appear crisper and brighter than before.
  • On the day after cataract removal, you’ll need to visit your eye doctor for the first postoperative visit. Future follow-up eye exams are generally scheduled at our eye clinics in Wyckoff and Woodcliff Lake at one week, one month, two months and six months later.
  • Complete healing takes about eight weeks, and your final vision prescription should be set about three months afterwards.

At James Tracey Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 646-916-4588 or book an appointment online to see one of our Midtown eye doctors.

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Why You Should Trust Your Optical Over Online Stores

We won’t argue with you – online shopping can be very easy and convenient. Without budging from the sofa, you can browse a variety of eyeglasses and click to buy. But plenty of risks lurk in every purchase you make from an online optical! Let’s compare the dangers and disadvantages of choosing new frames from a website versus the benefits of buying eyeglasses from our reliable optical in Midtown and Midland Park.

Cons of Buying Eyeglasses Online

  • The whole shopping experience is impersonal. No caring optician or eye care staff will listen to your visual requirements and lifestyle preferences to recommend the best, most reliable eyeglasses options.
  • You can’t ask an optician for a first-hand opinion of how you look
  • There’s no eye doctor to check that the fit of your frames is optimal; you’re on your own, left guessing about the right bridge span or pupillary distance.
  • Many optical stores have special deals with eyeglasses manufacturers, which enables you to receive rebates and discounts that are only available locally. Often, this makes your final cost less expensive.
  • Not all optical websites accept vision insurance.
  • Many studies show that over 50% of eyeglasses bought online were crafted with the wrong prescription or fit.

Pros of Purchasing Eyeglasses from Our Optical in Midtown and Midland Park

In our friendly local office, we strive to fulfill each customer’s vision needs, eye health requirements and sense of style. Even if your frames become your most favorite fashion accessory, they still need to give you sharp and comfortable vision. Our optical staff will assess your vision in your new eyeglasses, as well as how they fit on your face. Our goal is not simply to make a sale – it is to ensure that your new eyewear flatters your appearance and maximizes your clear and healthy eyesight.

At James Tracey Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 646-916-4588 or book an appointment online to see one of our Midtown eye doctors.

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Pink Eye? It Could Be Coronavirus

How to prevent conjunctivitis and protect your eyes

When you have a virus, especially one that causes a hacking cough, runny nose, and other symptoms of a common cold or flu, it’s typical for your eyes to also get puffy and red. You may be suffering from viral conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye.

How do viruses get into your eyes?

It’s rather simple. When you’re sick, you can easily transfer viruses to your eyes by sneezing, coughing into your hands, or blowing your nose – and then touching the area around your eye.

The coronavirus – pink eye connection

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), doctors have discovered that COVID-19 can cause conjunctivitis. If you’re standing within six feet of an infected person, and they cough or sneeze, the virus can enter your eye. Alternatively, if someone sneezes and virus particles land on the shopping cart that you take and push around a store, and then you touch your eyes without washing your hands first – you’re giving the virus direct access.

However, despite the apparent ease with which coronavirus can infect eyes, the AAO reports that only about 1 – 3% of all patients with the virus contract pink eye.

Preventing pink eye

Like always, prevention is the most effective medicine! Eye care professionals recommend following these tips to help prevent getting viral conjunctivitis:

  • Wash your hands correctly

The CDC instructs people to wash their hands in accordance with these steps: wet your hands, turn off the tap, apply soap, lather and scrub for 20 seconds, turn on tap and rinse. Air dry your hands, use a disposable paper towel and discard it immediately, or use a clean (not shared) towel.

  • Keep your fingers away from your face

No rubbing or wiping your eyes! Even if you don’t feel any symptoms of coronavirus, it’s essential not to touch any part of your face. To wipe away tears or remove makeup, use a clean tissue.

  • Don’t share your personal things

As generous as you may feel about letting others use your personal items, now’s the time to keep things to yourself. For example, the CDC recommends not sharing eye drops, makeup, makeup brushes, contact lenses cases, pillowcases, or towels. Pink eye is highly contagious.

  • Consider wearing glasses instead of contacts

While there’s currently no evidence to prove that wearing contacts raises your risks of contracting the novel coronavirus, there’s some evidence that shows you can get Covid-19 by touching a contaminated surface and then touching your eyes. In general, contact lenses wearers touch their eyes more often than people who wear eyeglasses, so it may be smart to make a temporary switch from contact lenses to glasses. However, this is only a friendly recommendation and not a hard-and-fast rule. If you prefer to stick with wearing contacts, washing your hands thoroughly can help keep you and your eyes safe.

Treatment for conjunctivitis

Regardless of whether your pink eye is caused by coronavirus or a different virus, there is no treatment for viral conjunctivitis. Usually, it goes away on its own within one to two weeks.

To alleviate your painful symptoms, eye doctors recommend:

  • Taking an over-the-counter pain medication, such as acetaminophen, ibuprofen or any anti-inflammatory drug
  • Applying a warm compress on your eye for a few minutes; take care to use a clean wash cloth each time and for each eye
  • Use artificial tears (lubricating eye drops) to soothe your eye irritation; don’t touch the bottle tip to your eye

Are you sick and have pink eye symptoms?

Now is not the time to make a DIY diagnosis. Eye redness, even if you have a virus, doesn’t necessarily indicate that you have conjunctivitis. A wide range of other conditions can lead to the same symptoms. Contact an eye doctor near you for help to figure out what’s causing your eye pain. Don’t visit your eye care practice without calling for guidance first, because extra precautions must be taken with patients who may have COVID-19.

At James Tracey Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 646-916-4588 or book an appointment online to see one of our Midtown eye doctors.

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Useful Eye Care Tips

Optometrist Near You

Optometrist Near You

Your eyes don’t only help you navigate in your daily life. They are often the first to signal problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Taking simple steps to keep your body and eyes healthy can help prevent serious physical and ocular conditions such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataracts and retinal detachment.

But looking after your eyes involves a lot more than just getting the right pair of corrective eyeglasses or contact lenses. Read on to learn ways to safeguard your vision and eye health for a heightened quality of life.

Reasons to Look After Your Eyes

By routinely getting your eyes examined and eating a healthy diet, you diminish your risk of developing AMD — especially the ‘wet’ form — and cataracts. Furthermore, by wearing the right eyewear for your lifestyle, you can avoid injuring your eyes.

Once you begin taking steps to care for your eyes, you eyemight become more aware of changes to your vision. If you notice vision abnormalities like sudden blurriness, flashing lights, halos, glare, black spots in your vision, wavy or distorted vision or red, sore eyes, visit Dr. James Sinoway for a comprehensive eye exam to get to the root of the issue and find solutions.

How to Care for Your Eyes

There are many ways to protect your ocular health.

  • Have comprehensive dilated eye exams on a regular basis. This is the single best thing you can do for your ocular health. It’s simple and painless. Even if you’re convinced that your eyes are healthy, you may have an undetected problem that could worsen over time, as many serious eye diseases don’t show any symptoms or warning signs in their early stages. These diseases can only be detected through a dilated eye exam, and the earlier they’re identified, the easier they are to treat.
    Getting frequent eye exams ensures that your visual acuity and physical health remain in check.To schedule an exam, contact James Tracey Eye Care today. We’re just a click away!
  • Wear the right eyewear for your activity. Wearing blue-light glasses when using the computer or wearing UV-protective sunglasses while outdoors can protect your eyes from harmful UV or blue light rays. Blue-light glasses help reduce or prevent digital eye strain, while UV-blocking sunglasses limit your exposure to harmful sunlight.
  • Give your eyes a break. Aim for at least eight hours of shut-eye per night. In addition to sleeping, you can give your eyes a much-needed break by frequently looking away from the screen and staring at things in the distance.
  • Follow contact lens hygiene protocols. Because debris and proteins can accumulate on your contact lenses, it’s important to regularly disinfect and clean them to prevent an eye infection. If it’s too arduous to follow a cleaning routine, you can opt for disposable daily wear contacts.
  • Eat a balanced diet. For your eyes’ sake, make sure to get the right amount of nutrients and eat a healthy and balanced diet. In fact, certain antioxidants have been shown to effectively reduce the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration and other serious ocular conditions. These include Lutein and zeaxanthin, Omega-3 fatty acids, Vitamins C and E, and Zinc.
  • Don’t smoke. Smoking doesn’t just harm your lungs. It can also heighten your risk of developing macular degeneration and cataracts, and even damage your optic nerve — potentially leading to vision loss.
  • Exercise. Being physically active helps you not only feel great, but also lowers your risk of developing health conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol — all of which can lead to eye problems. For example, people with diabetes run the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy, which can lead to vision loss and blindness.

Experiencing Vision Changes or Problems? Don’t Wait!

It’s not uncommon for people with vision problems to wait far too long before getting their eyes examined. If you’re experiencing vision problems, such as blurred vision, halos, blind spots, and floaters, or any ocular pain or other worrying symptoms, have your eyes checked as soon as possible.

Here’s the takeaway. Protecting your health by eating well, not smoking, exercising, wearing the proper eyewear and getting annual eye exams can go a long way toward keeping your eyes happy and healthy!

Get in touch with James Tracey Eye Care in Midtown to set up your next eye exam to make sure your eyes are healthy and that your prescription is up to date.

Did You Know That 20% of People Sleep With Their Eyes Open?

eye doctor treating eye open during sleep near you

Ever heard the saying “to sleep with one eye open”? It’s generally used as a metaphor when advising one to stay vigilant. But sleeping with eyes open is a common eye and sleep disorder known as nocturnal lagophthalmos. In fact, the National Sleep Foundation estimates that about 1 in 5 people sleep with their eyes open.

This condition is problematic because it can interfere with sleep and impact eye health. People may not get as much sleep, or sleep as soundly as they’d like, due to the pain and discomfort caused by the eyes drying out during the night.

Nocturnal lagophthalmos generally indicates an underlying medical condition, such as a thyroid problem or an autoimmune disorder. If upon waking you experience irritated, dry, tired, red, or painful eyes, or if you suspect you might be sleeping with your eyes open, speak with Dr. James Sinoway at James Tracey Eye Care today.

What Happens When You Sleep With Your Eyes Open?

People who have nocturnal lagophthalmos may not even know they have it. It is difficult to evaluate whether your eyes are closed when you’re actually asleep. However, some important indicators may point to the condition, including:

  • Eyes that feel scratchy, irritated and dry
  • Blurred vision
  • Red eyes
  • Eye pain
  • Tired eyes

For those with nocturnal lagophthalmos, the eye loses the protection of a closed lid and becomes dehydrated, causing the tear layer to evaporate and the eyes to become dry. Nocturnal lagophthalmos also reduces the eye’s ability to discharge contaminants such as dust and debris that fall into the eye during the night. These contaminants can potentially lead to:

  • Eye infections
  • Corneal damage, such as corneal abrasion, sores and ulcers
  • Eye dryness and irritation
  • Poor quality sleep
  • Loss of vision

Why Do We Close Our Eyes to Sleep?

There are several reasons why it’s important to close our eyes while we sleep. Closed eyelids block light, which stimulates the brain to wakefulness.

Closing our eyes also protects and lubricates the eyes while we sleep. If your eyelids don’t close, your eyes become more susceptible to dryness, infections, and debris that can scratch and damage the cornea.

Why do Certain People Sleep With Their Eyes Open?

There are a number of reasons people might sleep with their eyes open. The most common reasons for nocturnal lagophthalmos include:

Problems With Facial Nerves and Muscles

Issues with facial nerves and muscles surrounding the eyelid can cause the lid to remain open during sleep. Weakness in facial nerves can be attributed to several factors.

  • Injury or trauma
  • Stroke
  • Tumor
  • Bell’s palsy, a condition that causes temporary paralysis or weakness of facial muscles.
  • Autoimmune disorders and infections, such as Lyme disease, chickenpox, Guillain-Barre syndrome, mumps, and several others.
  • Moebius syndrome, a rare condition that causes problems with cranial nerves.

Damaged Eyelids

Eyelids can become damaged as a result of surgery, injury or illness, making it difficult to fully close the eyes during sleep. Furthermore, a condition known as floppy eyelid syndrome can also interfere with eye closure, and is often associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is commonly linked to eye diseases like glaucoma and optic neuropathy.

Thyroid-Related Eye Problems

A common symptom of Grave’s disease, a form of hypothyroidism, is protruding eyes. The bulging eyes, known as Graves’ ophthalmopathy, can prevent the eyes from closing.

Genetics

There also tends to be a genetic component to nocturnal lagophthalmos, as it often runs in families. Whatever the cause, the symptoms of nocturnal lagophthalmos are uncomfortable and the consequences can lead to ocular complications.

Can Nocturnal Lagophthalmos Be Treated?

This condition can be treated in several ways, depending on the underlying cause and severity of symptoms. Treatments include:

  • Administering artificial tears throughout the day, providing a film of moisture around the eyes that protects them at night.
  • Wearing an eye mask or goggles to protect the eyes from external debris and visual stimulation. These items are uniquely designed to generate moisture for the eyes while you sleep.
  • Using a humidifier, which provides a moisture-rich environment to prevent your eyes from drying out.
  • Wearing eyelid weights to help keep the eyelids closed.
  • In acute cases, surgery may be recommended.

Make sure to consult your Midtown eye doctor before undertaking any of these treatments.

Because nocturnal lagophthalmos sometimes signals an underlying condition, it is especially important to contact Dr. James Sinoway at James Tracey Eye Care in Midtown for a proper diagnosis and to receive prompt treatment. If nocturnal lagophthalmos is left untreated for an extended period, patients risk seriously damaging their eyes and vision.


At James Tracey Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 646-916-4588 to find out our eye exam appointment availability. or to request an appointment with one of our Midtown eye doctors.

Best Eye Hygiene Tips

4 Tips to Prevent Eye Infections | Eye Doctor Near You

What Causes Eye Infections?

Viruses are responsible for many infections, such as the flu, the common cold, conjunctivitis (pink eye) and coronavirus. With the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in full-swing, it’s important to be aware of good hygiene practices, especially for the eyes, as they are a portal for infectious diseases. By implementing the practices below, you can significantly reduce the risk of contracting or transmitting a viral infection.

What Is a Virus?

A virus is a submicroscopic infectious agent that reproduces itself by invading a host cell, replicating its DNA inside it. This infected cell then replicates rapidly, spreading millions of new viral cells throughout the body. Once infected, we feel sick and experience the unpleasant side effects of rising temperature, sore limbs and other symptoms as our immune system recognizes the virus as being foreign and vigorously fights against it.

How Does a Virus Travel Between Organisms?

For a virus to cause disease, it must first enter a body, called a target host. A target host can get infected directly, via infected droplets (such as when kissing), or indirectly, when coming into contact with droplets from a cough, sneeze, or tears left on a surface. Infected droplets enter the body through one of the mucous membranes, such as the eyes, nose or mouth.

Even if the infected person near you shows no symptoms, they can still be contagious. Depending on the virus, it can survive on a surface for some time and can be picked up from a doorknob or an elevator button. This is why practicing good hygiene is an effective way to prevent indirect viral transmission.

4 Crucial Eye Hygiene Practices

By implementing the following hygiene practices, you will better protect yourself and others from viral infection.

1. Routinely wash your hands

We, humans, touch many surfaces throughout the day. If we’re not careful, we can catch an infection, particularly from hard surfaces like plastic and stainless steel.

Viruses can also be picked up while preparing and eating food; using the toilet; or handling an animal. Make sure that you regularly and thoroughly wash your hands, ideally for a minimum of 20 seconds with soap and water, to kill viruses (and bacteria) on the surface of your skin. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

2. Keep your hands off your face

Studies show that the average person touches their face up to 23 times per hour, and that the majority of contacts involve the eyes, nose and mouth. Doing so puts you at risk for getting a virus or transmitting the virus to another. Try to be conscious and avoid touching your face whenever possible.

3. Avoid rubbing your eyes

Rubbing your eyes is an instinctual response to tiredness or itchy eyes. It feels great to rub your eyes because doing so stimulates tear production, temporarily relieves itchiness, lubricates the eyes, and removes irritants. However, if your hands are unwashed, rubbing your eyes can put you at risk of contracting an infection, such as conjunctivitis or coronavirus. In fact, conjunctivitis has been linked to respiratory infections like the common cold, the flu, and COVID-19.

4. Use makeup with caution

Given the information provided above regarding infections, the following advice should come as no surprise:

  • Don’t share your makeup with anyone else, whether for eyes, lips or face.
  • Don’t use a cosmetic brush previously used by another when testing makeup products. Instead, request single-use applicators and wands.
  • Don’t use a product past its expiration date.
  • Don’t use the same makeup products after you’ve been sick or have had an eye infection.
  • Don’t share face cloths or face towels with anyone else.
James Tracey Eye Care at Midtown is committed to helping you manage your long-term eye health. From all of us at James Tracey Eye Care, please stay safe and take care of yourself and your loved ones. Call us today: 646-916-4588 to find out our eye exam appointment availability or to request an appointment with one of our Midtown eye doctors.

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