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What Are The Top Benefits To Wearing Computer Glasses?

Computer Glasses and Eye Exams in Midtown

Computer Glasses & Eye Exams

What Are Computer Glasses and Do They Make a Difference?

Many people spend most of their waking hours staring at screens, exposing them to the potentially harmful effects of blue light. In fact, if you’re reading this on one of your screens, you’re exposing your eyes to blue light at this very moment.

All this screen time comes at a price: It can cause headaches, eyestrain, insomnia, and possibly eye disease. Blue light glasses (also known as computer glasses) have been touted to combat these problems head-on. But do they really make a difference to those who spend many hours a day staring at screens?

What Is Blue Light?

Blue light is a color in the light spectrum visible to human eyes — though it doesn’t actually appear blue to the naked eye.

It’s a short wavelength that produces high amounts of energy (from 400 to 500 nanometers) and is often referred to as high-energy visible light (HEV). In fact, any source of visible light emits blue light, whether it’s an artificial source like a digital screen or a light bulb, or a natural one, like the sun.

How Does Blue Light Affect Your Eyes?

It Obstructs the Wake/Sleep Cycle

Prior to the invention of artificial light, the sun regulated our sleep schedules. After sundown, the darkness signals to our bodies that it’s time to produce melatonin, the hormone responsible for enabling us to sleep.

Nowadays, we’re exposed to blue light throughout the day and late into the night. While exposure to any light in the evening hours delays the production of melatonin, blue light waves can be particularly problematic as they radically disrupt these signals, causing less melatonin to be generated.

This essentially throws off our natural body clocks, since the brain associates blue light with daytime, making it harder to fall asleep at night and wake up in the morning.

It May Increase the Risk of Macular Degeneration

A 2018 study by the University of Alcalá suggests that a high level of blue light exposure may increase one’s risk of macular degeneration later in life, which can lead to permanent vision loss.

This is because blue light penetrates right through the cornea to the retina, damaging light-sensitive cells in the retina.

It Can Potentially Cause Eye Strain

Blue light scatters more easily than other visible light. This unfocused light reduces contrast and can contribute to digital eye strain, characterized by headaches, neck pain, and blurred vision.

That’s where computer glasses come in.

Research has indicated that lenses that filter out blue light significantly increase contrast. Computer glasses with yellow-tinted lenses may improve comfort levels when viewing digital devices for prolonged periods of time.

Are There Benefits to Wearing Computer Glasses?

As mentioned above, computer glasses reduce blue light exposure from computer screens and other digital devices. But are they worth getting?

According to the American Macular Degeneration Foundation, blue light can cause retinal damage “at greater intensities,” but the amount of light emitted by screens is quite low. Whether there is a cumulative effect requires further research.

Getting Computer Glasses

If you decide to get blue-light blocking lenses, you can find stylish options with or without a prescription. So if you’re farsighted and wear progressive lenses or bifocals, you can get single-lens computer glasses to match your prescription.

You may want to consider getting photochromic lenses, as they provide protection from both UV and blue light, whether indoors or out in the sun. These lenses seamlessly and automatically darken when exposed to UV rays outdoors, and become clear again when indoors.

James Tracey Eye Care in Midtown offers a variety of computer glasses and lenses. Contact us today to discuss the optimal lens features for your lifestyle and get fitted for your perfect pair.

Computer Glasses & Digital Eye Strain | James Tracey Eye Care

Frequently Asked Questions About Computer Glasses

Q: Are There Benefits to Wearing Computer Glasses?

  • A: Computer glasses reduce blue light exposure from computer screens and other digital devices. According to the American Macular Degeneration Foundation, blue light can cause retinal damage “at greater intensities,” but the amount of light emitted by screens is quite low. Whether there is a cumulative effect requires further research.

Q: Will Wearing Computer Glasses Mean Fewer Breaks?

  • A: In addition to computer glasses and ergonomic devices, doctors advise people to take frequent breaks while using digital devices. Walk around, stretch, go outside, and find other activities to do in between computer use. This, combined with visual aids, can help improve or even prevent DES and CVS from developing.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses Visit James Tracey Eye Care for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

Frequently Asked Questions with Dr. Stephanie Hanson

 

Q: What Are Computer Glasses and Do They Make a Difference?

  • A: Many people spend most of their waking hours staring at screens, exposing them to the potentially harmful effects of blue light. In fact, if you’re reading this on one of your screens, you’re exposing your eyes to blue light at this very moment.All this screen time comes at a price: It can cause headaches, eyestrain, insomnia, and possibly eye disease. Blue light glasses (also known as computer glasses) have been touted to combat these problems head-on. But do they really make a difference to those who spend many hours a day staring at screens?

Q: What Is Blue Light?

  • A: Blue light is a color in the light spectrum visible to human eyes — though it doesn’t actually appear blue to the naked eye.It’s a short wavelength that produces high amounts of energy (from 400 to 500 nanometers) and is often referred to as high-energy visible light (HEV). In fact, any source of visible light emits blue light, whether it’s an artificial source like a digital screen or a light bulb, or a natural one, like the sun.

Quality Designer Frames Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses


Frequently Asked Questions with James Sinoway O.D.

Q: Can you request lenses made from glass? Is glass still used for lenses?

  • A: Yes. Opticians still sometimes use glass for lenses. However, glass is not used very often because they aren’t as safe. If these glass lenses break, they can shatter into many pieces and can injure the eye. Glass lenses are much heavier than plastic lenses, so they can make your eyeglasses less comfortable to wear.

Q: Can a coating be added to eyeglasses to protect them from further scratches?

  • A: A protective coating can’t be added to a lens after it’s scratched. The coating is applied when the lens is manufactured and can’t be put on later.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses In Midland Park, New Jersey. Visit James Tracey Eye Care for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.

5 Reasons to Buy Blue Light Glasses In-Store

Designer Computer Eyeglasses | James Tracey Eye Care

Designer Computer Eyeglasses | James Tracey Eye Care

Wearing blue light glasses has become more and more of a trend, and there’s a very good reason for it! Blue light contributes to eye strain and can disrupt sleep patterns. Although more research is needed, some studies have even suggested a link between blue light exposure and diabetes and heart disease

As a result, people are turning to an online retailer to order these glasses. While it’s logical that people would opt for the convenience of purchasing blue glasses online, it’s important to be wary of the hassle and inaccuracy that can result when you don’t order through an optician.

Check out these 5 reasons you should we wary of buying blue light glasses online:

1. Not getting what you asked for

According to a study recently conducted by The American Optometric Association (AOA) that had researched the 10 most popular online retailers, 29% of eyeglasses ordered online had at least one lens that didn’t meet the required prescription. Wearing the wrong prescription can cause eye strain and headaches. The advantage of buying these glasses at an optical practice is that you can be sure you’ll get the right fit and correct prescription for your needs, ensuring optimal comfort and clear vision.

2. You can’t verify the quality

The problem with ordering online is that you can’t assess the quality and check for a loose hinge. James Tracey Eye Care only stocks quality frames and our optometric staff is trained to ensure you wear the proper fit and enjoy quality eyewear.

3. Cheaper frames can cause skin irritation — or worse

Along the same line, low-quality frames can end up costing you more in the long run. When browsing online, certain frames may look more expensive but could be made of low-grade materials that can cause skin irritation over time. Not only can they irritate your skin, but they can also get bleached by UV rays and the finish can worsen after a few months of wear.

4. Online virtual try-on’s can’t ensure satisfaction

If you’re buying glasses online, you’ll often have access to some sort of virtual try-on feature. This requires you to upload a forward-facing, close-up photo of yourself and you can then superimpose images of different frames on your face to see how they look.

While a virtual try-on can give you a rough idea of how you’ll look wearing different frames, it can’t tell you how the frames will feel.

5. Know what’s being cut to offer lower prices

Online retailers cut costs by using cheap materials and cut corners on customer service and safety standards. Over 20% do not meet ANSI safety standards and you don’t get the personalized attention and fitting expertise of a qualified optician. That’s a huge part of the value equation!

Eliminate the guesswork that comes with ordering online and get your blue light glasses at James Tracey Eye Care in Midtown. We’ll ensure that you get the perfect fit, quality and comfort thanks to our highly trained optometric team.

Can You Limit Blue Light Exposure?

Computer Glasses Available at James Tracey Eye Care

Computer Glasses Available at James Tracey Eye Care

The topic of blue light has grown in popularity over the last decade, as indoor blue light exposure from computer screens and handheld digital devices has grown. You may hear varying opinions about whether blue light affects the eyes and to what degree, so continue reading to learn what we think is the most relevant information on the subject.

What is Blue Light?

Every color of visible light has a different wavelength and energy level. Colors like red, orange, and yellow have longer wavelengths and carry less energy than colors like blue and purple.

Because blue light carries higher energy, it can easily reach the retina at the back of the eye. Although some of the eye’s structures filter out harmful rays like ultraviolet light, they allow blue light to penetrate.

The sun, digital screens, and LED and fluorescent lighting all emit blue light.

How Does Blue Light Affect Eye Health?

The retina’s light-sensitive cells (photoreceptors) can be damaged by blue light when overexposed. In severe cases, this kind of cell damage produces similar symptoms to macular degeneration, and can even cause blindness.

Further research is needed to determine how much natural and man-made blue light is excessive, and what effect it has on eye health. Until more is known, many people err on the side of caution and try to limit their blue light exposure, especially from digital devices.

What is certain is that blue light contributes to digital eye strain. Because blue light has more energy and scatters more freely than other light (the reason that the sky appears blue), it is not easily focused. As the scattered blue light rays enter the eye, they create visual “noise” that is believed to be partly responsible for digital eye strain symptoms such as watery eyes, headache, blurry vision, and dry eyes.

How You Can Limit Blue Light Exposure

There are several ways to limit the amount of blue light that enters your eyes. You can purchase blue light filters for your devices, or simply reduce screen time.

If you spend a significant amount of time staring at a screen daily, you may want to consider purchasing computer glasses or blue light filters for your lenses. These glasses are available with or without a prescription, so they are compatible with contact lenses as well. Computer glasses are customized to meet the needs of your eyes and lifestyle.

To learn more about computer glasses or blue light, call James Tracey Eye Care and make an appointment with . We can help guide you in choosing the right glasses that meet your visual needs.

REFERENCES:
Blue Light and Your Eyes
Blue light – What is all the fuss about?
Blue light facts: How blue light affects your eyes

Computer Lenses – Blue Light & Digital Eye Strain

Blue Light & Digital Eye Strain Eye Doctor Near You

Can Too Much Blue Light Hurt My Eyes?

When people think of workplace dangers to the eyes, it is usually machinery, chemicals or construction materials that come to mind. However, a growing danger to the eyes is one that may be less obvious – exposure to blue light from digital devices, television and computer screens and artificial lighting.

While the long-term effects of blue light or high-energy visible (HEV) light emission are not yet fully known, what is known is that blue light is a cause of computer vision syndrome (CVS) and sleep disruptions. 60% of people spend more than 6 hours a day in front of a digital device and 70% of adults report some symptoms of computer vision syndrome (CVS) which include eyestrain, headaches, blurred or double vision, physical and mental fatigue, dry or watery eyes, difficulty focusing, sensitivity to light, or neck, shoulder or back pain (caused by compromised posture to adjust to vision difficulty). Most people do nothing to ease their discomfort from these symptoms because they are not aware of the cause.

In its natural form, blue light from the sun is actually beneficial to your body by helping to regulate your natural sleep and wake cycles – also known as your circadian rhythm. It can also boost your mood, alertness and overall feeling of well-being. However, prolonged exposure to artificial sources of blue light, such as that found in electronic devices, television and energy-efficient fluorescent and LED lights, has been shown to cause disruptions in the circadian rhythm as well as more serious vision problems. Researchers at Harvard University have linked blue light with damage to the retina at the back of your eyes, indicating that long-term exposure to blue light could be linked to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and possibly other serious health and vision problems.

Since 43% of adults work at jobs that require prolonged use of a computer, tablet or other digital monitor, blue light is an increasingly serious threat to your vision, health and productivity. There are a number of options for reducing your exposure to blue light which include computer glasses, specialized lenses and protective coatings. Speak to our eye care professionals to determine which option is best for you.

Single Vision Computer Glasses

  • Provide the optimum lens power and field of view for viewing your computer screen without straining or leaning in to reduce symptoms of CVS. These are ideal for when the computer is at a fixed working distance, and work well if the user needs to view multiple screens at the same working distance.

Office Lenses or Progressive Lenses

  • No-line multifocal eyewear that can be made to correct near, intermediate and some distance vision with a larger intermediate zone for computer vision if indicated. Perfect for those with presbyopia which is the gradual loss of focusing ability that occurs naturally with age. Office lenses work like progressive lenses but provide a wider field of view for intermediate (1-3 m) viewing distance and near working distance (about 40 cm).

Blue-Blocking Lenses

  • Definitely recommended for this electronic age, blue-blocking lenses block blue light emitted from computer screens that is associated with glare, eye strain and possible sleep disturbances.
  • Anti-glare and filtering coatings (treatments): Eliminate reflections from the surfaces of your lens to reduce eye strain and discomfort from glare. Some coatings can also block blue light emitted from computer screens.

While all of these are good options for protecting your eyes, the 20/20/20 rule still applies – after every 20 minutes of near tasks, look at something beyond 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds…it’s a good time to stretch the rest of the body too.

Additionally, diets high in lutein and zeaxanthin, which are carotenoids found in dark, leafy green vegetables like spinach and kale are protective to blue light damage.

A note about children and blue light:

Children are more prone to blue light damage than adults because the natural lenses in their eyes are so clear that blue light passes easily through to reach the retina. Adults are somewhat less prone since the older we get our natural lenses to become more cloudy and blue light does not pass through quite as easily. Pediatricians recommend that young children under the age of two should get ZERO screen time. They have much better ways of developing their eyesight with activities requiring hand-eye coordination with high contrast physical objects.

Technology is advancing the world, and our jobs and daily lives will only continue to rely upon it. Don’t let technology get in the way of your vision and your health. Ask us about the best solution for you.

At James Tracey Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain a healthy vision. Call us today: 646-916-4588 or to request an appointment to see one of our Midtown eye doctors.

It’s Time to Talk About Blue Light

Blue light. Do you know what it is? Do you know where it comes from, or how it can be harmful to your eyes? If you don’t know the answers to these questions, you are not alone, yet it is important that you become aware to protect your eyes for now and the years to come.

The reason blue light is suddenly becoming a big issue is because other than the sun, which is the biggest source of blue light, a significant source of blue light emission comes from digital devices and artificial lighting. As our world becomes increasingly digital – think: HD televisions, LED lights, computers, smartphones, tablets – we are all exposing our eyes to more and more amounts of blue light than ever before. And we are only beginning to understand the long term effects this has on our bodies and our eyes.

One of the biggest issues with blue light is that whether it is through work or leisure, people are exposed to screens at a close range for a large portion of the day. A survey from the Vision Council entitled, “Blue Light Exposure and Digital Eye Strain” recently showed that 87% of respondents used digital devices for more than two hours a day and over 52% regularly used two digital devices as the same time. This shift has drastically increased exposure and the number of symptoms that are reported. To date, research has shown that there are a number of ways blue light can impact your eyes including digital eye strain, sleep disturbances and retina damage that can lead to long term problems including serious eye diseases.

What You Need to Know About Your Vision

Digital eye strain is a condition that is characterized by dry, sore, tired or burning eyes, eye fatigue and sensitivity to light. It can also cause blurred or double vision, headaches, back, neck and shoulder aches and difficulty focusing or concentrating. These symptoms are most common in individuals that sit in front of the computer for two or more hours a day.

Studies show that exposure to blue light right before bedtime can cause disruptions in sleep and wakefulness because it causes a shift in the levels of melatonin, a hormone which affects your circadian rhythm and therefore your sleep patterns. So if you are using your smartphone to wind down in bed, put it down and dust off an old hardcover book!

Retina damage has been found to be a possible result of long term blue light exposure causing damage to the retinal cells in the eye which are responsible for clear vision. There has been evidence that this type of damage can lead to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts later in life. In certain cases, your doctor might recommend Lutein and Zeaxanthin nutritional supplements to protect the macula from blue light damage.

Despite these risks, few people are taking action to protect their eyes from blue light. A recent study from Transitions Optical, The 2017 Employee Perceptions of Vision Benefits Survey, showed that there is also a significant generational difference in knowledge, habits, and attitude regarding blue light with millennials being more aware and concerned about the health effects it has on their eyes. Millennials are more likely to request prescription eyewear that has blue light protection and to know whether their current pair has that extra coverage. However, even the millennial generation is significantly lacking in awareness and prevention.

Make an Eye Exam Appointment Near You

The best way to gain awareness of and protection against blue light is to speak to your eye doctor. There are a number of ways you can protect your eyes which include computer glasses, blue light lens filters, or even blue light filter screen protectors or apps that reverse screen colours for those that don’t use prescription eyewear. Each individual can find the best solution based on lifestyle, work environment and personal comfort. The most important takeaway is that you understand that blue light is an issue, take responsibility for your eye health and speak to your eye doctor about the best blue light solutions for you and your family.

At James Tracey Eye Care, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: 646-916-4588 or <a href=”/make-appointment/ ” rel=”noopener nofollow noreferrer”>to request an appointment</a> to see one of our Midtown eye doctors.